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Full text of "Art souvenir of representative men, public buildings, private residences, business houses, and points of interest in Terre Haute, Ind."

Gc I M. ^• 

977.202 

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1655569 1 



GENEALOGY v^Ci-i_.ECiiOM 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02293 3771 



RT SOUVENIRi. 






or . . . 



REPRESENTATIVE /nEN. 
PUB LIC BUILDINGS. 
PRIVATE RESlDEfJCES. 



.BUSINESS MOUSES. 



AND POINTS or INTEREST 



'^^^^-'' Terre Haute, Ind. 



PREPARED POR THE 



TERRE hAUTE GAZETTE. 



1894. 



<ELLY BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS. 




HE Gazette's object in the publication of this volume is to 
give a pictorial represeutation of Terre Haute's citizens, 
institutions and points of interest as they appear in 1894. 
Pictures, and especially those made from the ever minutely 
accurate camera, convey impressions much more clearly 
than words. For this reason the descriptive matter which 
prefaces the photographs is much condensed and is chiefly statistical. 
Some of the photographs are old, but most of them have been taken 
especially for this volume and are, therefore, up to date. The idea has 
been to make a book so convenient in size, so excellent in printing and so 
durable in binding that it will not be put away in some drawer to be mislaid, 
but will be entitled to a position on the center table with the family 
photographs 

Of course it is not complete. It ha.s been impossible to get some 
photographs which ought to be in it; but it is thoroughly representative of 
the professional and business men of the city. 



by. 



Such a pictorial history will have increasing interest as the years roll 
A similar volume ought to be issued every five or ten years. 



1655569 

HISTORICAL. 

Terre Haute and Indiana are of the same a^e. Both were born in 1816. 

In the great territory between the Mississippi river and tlie Alle- 
gheny mountains and the lakes and the Ohio river, the Wabash is the most 
considerable river. On the east bank of the stream, midway between its 
head waters and its mouth, nature had placed an elevated plateau. It was 
the natural site for a town. The highland that made it the proper location 
for a town suggested to the French voyageurs its name of Terre Haute. 

Later on the descriptive appellation of the Prairie City was given it. 
when the little cluster of houses huddled together on the river bank had 
spread out from the thin fringe of forest skirting the river at that point to the 
open prairie beyond. But tree planting along the streets and in the yards 
began so eaily, and was prosecuted so persistently, that Foresi City would be 
more appropriate than Prairie City now. 

Terre Haute Is in latitude 39° 28' north, longitude 10° 20' west. Its 
altitude above sea level is 498 feet. 

One Joseph Kitchell had entered the land on which the town stands, 
acquiring title from the government. Of him it was purchased by the 
Terre Haute Land Company consisting of Cuthbert and Thomas Bullitt, of 
Louisville. Abraham Markle, Hyacinth La Salle and Jonathan Lindley. 
They oi'ganized a town company and filed the original town plat October 
2.5th. 1816, and an amended plat May 20th, 1825. When it became incumbent 
upon the three commissioners appointed by act of the legislature to locate a 
county seat for the newly organized county of Vigo, the Terre Haute Town 
Company secured it by a donation of the public square and other lots, and 
$4,000 for the erection of a court house and other buildings. 

The first census of the town was taken by the late Charles T. Noble 
in 1829, for his own satisfaction, and showed 579 inhabitants. Another 
census was taken by Mr. Noble. August 5th, 1835, and it disclosed a popula- 
tion of 1,214 inhabitants. The United States census of 1840 showed 2,300; 
1850. 3,572: 1860, 8,594; 1870, 16,103: 1880, 26,042; 1890, 30.217. 

Incorporation as a town was accomplished under act of the legislature 
Jan. 26th, 1832. April 30th, 1843, it was decided by a popular vote to 
become a city and the first election for city officers occurred on the 30th of 
May. 1843, the total number of votes cast at Lhe election being 752. 



In its early days the only way of getting to Terre Haute or away 
from it was by the river. Other towns were far distant. Man set to work 
to bring them near. The first step was the completion, in 1833, as far as 
Terre Haute, of the National Road, that great highway projected from Mary- 
land to Missouri by the national government. In 1849 the Wabash and Erie 
Canal was opened and the first boat reached the town. It was an epoch in 
its history. But the canal was doomed almost before it was done, for in 
1852 the railroad from Terre Haute to Indianapolis was opened and the 
frontier town of a few years before was thenceforth to be linked by iron 
bands to all the continent. Other roads followed in quick succession until 
today it is the center of nine roads radiating from it as the spokes from the 
hub of a wheel, making it as a railroad center the second city in Indiana. 

In certain widely divergent lines Terre Haute stands pre-eminent 
among her sister cities of the State. No other city of Indiana has so many 
educational in.stitutions or so many students. She is the Athens and 
Alexandria of Indiana. 

In the production of pig iron and the manufactures into which iron 
enters, no other city in the State approaches Terre Haute. This is also 
true of the manufactured products from corn, and of the production of 
alcohol. 

In those essential elements of urban existence, light, water, cheap 
•fuel gas and street transportation, she is equipped as well as any city in 
world, for she has the latest and best. 

Within the next few years there is every reason to expect a develop- 
ment and a growth greater than at any time In the past, for her advantages 
are every day becoming better known and all they need, to be appreciated, 
is to be known. 

EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGES. 

Terre Haute is the educational center of Indiana. This is not an 
idle boast; it is a fortunate fact. There are other cities which have impor- 
tant educational institutions. Lafayette, Greencastle and Bloomington all 
have one college each, of which the citizens of the State may be justly 
proud; but Terre Haute has a number, and among them the largest State 
institution— The Indiana State Normal, with an attendance of 1,300; the 
Rose Polytechnic Institute; two Female Colleges; two Commercial Colleges, 
and a great free and parochial school system. Education of both sexes in 
all branches may be here obtained. The advantages are so obvious as to 
attract the attention of parents all over the country. The following is a 
brief review of the schools: 



R05E POLYTECHNIC. 

Owing to the munificence of tlie late Chauncey Rose, Terre Haute can 
boast of as fine a school as there is in the country, in the Rose Polytechnic 
Institute, which is devoted to higher education of young men in chemistry, 
mechanical, civil and electrical engineering. 

It was incorporated in 1874 under the name of Terre Haute School of 
Industrial Science. The corner stone of the "academic building" was laid 
on the 11th of September, 1875, and on the same day the board of managers 
amended the articles of incorporation, changing the name of the association 
to the "Rose Polytechnic Institute." 

The Institute was opened March 7th, 1883. The following persons 
compose the board of managers: 

Hon. Richard W. Thompson, LL. D., - - President. 

Ray G. Jenckes. Esq., Secretary. 

Demas Deming, Esq., ----- Treasurer. 

Hon. William Mack. Preston Hussey Esq., Wm. C. Ball, A, M. 

Leslie D. Thomas, A. M., William S. Rea, Esq., Robert S. Cox, M E. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The Terre Haute free public school system dates from January 21st, 
1853. Sixty-three ditterent persons, twenty-five of whom are still living, 
have served in the capacity of school trustees. James Hook is the sole 
survivor of the first school board. The life of the late Miss Jane Hersey 
was closely related to the history of our schools, she having taught in Terre 
Haute's public schools from 1853 to 1892. 

The growth of the schools is not in any way more clearly manifested, 
perhaps, than in the obligations of the treasurer of the board. In 1853 the 
bond was $3,000; it is now $200,000. 

LIST OF SrPERIXTENDENTS. 

Wm. M. Ross, - - Sept. 9. 1853, to July 14, 1854. 

James H. Moore, - Sept. 5, 1860, to Mar. 17, 1862. 

Joseph W. Snow, - - Sept. 1, 1862, to Sept. 1, 1863. 

John M. Olcott, - Aug. 17, 1863, to Sept. 4, 1869. 

Wm. H. Wiley, - - June 3, 1869, to present time. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



DISTRICTS. 


LOCATIONS. 


VALUES, ■ 


High School 


Seventh and Walnut 

Fourth and Mulberry 

Seventh and Swan 

Third and Farrington 


3 85.000 
34.000 
2^.500 
25 500 


First 

Second 

Third 


Fourth 


635 North Fifth 


18 000 


Fifth 


Twelfth and Chestnut 


24 500 


Sixth 


Twelfth and Ohio 


40 500 


Seventh 


1421 Second Ave 


24 000 


Eighth 

Ninth 


17th St. and Franklin Ave 

Third and Oak 


7.500 

5.700 

4.500 

.400 

6.000 

.700 

5.000 

2.500 

25.000 

27.000 

11 000 


Tenth 


1500 South 13V" 


Eleventh 


In Normal 


Twelfth 




Thirteenth 


Third St. and Sth Ave 


Fourteentn 

Fifteenth 


Sixteenth and Elni 

Eighteenth and Chestnut 

Eighth and College 


Sixteenth 


Seventeenth 


Seventh St. and Third Ave 

70914 Wabash Ave 


Office 




.300 






Total 




$ 871.600 



The enrollment during 1894 was 5,976. 

THE TERRE HAUTE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

nod^i Wabash Avenue, Mrs Lucy C. Wonner. Librarian. Contains 
10,583 volumes. It is under the direction and control of the Board of 
School Trustees. 

THE INDIANA STATE NORMAL. 

The act of the General Assembly which erected the Indiana State 
Normal School was approved December 20, 1865. Terre Haute gave the 
ground and .^50,000 in cash. The school opened .January 6, 1870. The 
building was destroyed by fire, April 9, 1888. The accumulation of eighteen 
years was destroyed. The city provided suitable temporary quarters and 
subscribed $50,000 to rebuild the school The State gave .^100,000 and the 
building was rebuilt by Shewmacker and Junclaus. of Indianapolis. In 1892 
the legislature gave .$40,000 for an additional building. The attendance 
this year (1894) was over 1,200. Total number of students since the opening 
has been 10,220. 



The Summer School is uow a permanent and vabuable feature of the 
Normal, and is conducted with much ability. 

TERRE HAUTE COHMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

The Terre Haute Commercial College was founded in 1863, by Prof. 
William H. Garvin, and is one of the great schools of the State. There are 
about 250 students in the four departments of shorthand, typewriting, 
actual business and telegraphy. All the branches usually taught in the best 
commercial schools are included in the course. The faculty consists of seven 
teachers. It is now conducted by Prof. W. C. Isbell. 

GARVIN COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

Garvin's Commercial College was opened the first part of the year 
1893. by a stock company, composed of business men of Terre Haute. It is 
located at the north east corner of Third and Wabash Avenue. The course 
of study includes book-keeping, penmanship, commercial law, business 
forms, shorthand and typewriting. The enrollment numbers about thirty- 
five pupils. The school is now owned and conducted by Messrs Will Garvin 
and Patrick W. Haggerty. 

COATES COLLEGE. 

Coates College is a plant of the Presbyterian Church, under the care 
of the General Assembly's Board of Aid for Colleges, and was founded 
March 17, 1885, by Mrs. Jane Patterson Coates, of Greencastle. 

Coates College is situated on a plateau at the foot of Sixth Street, on 
what is known as the "Strawberry Hill." The grounds abound in wild 
flowers and forest trees. 

The school and grounds occupy 13 acres and the estimated value of 
all belongings of the school is $100,000. Mrs. Coates' endowment amounted 
to $.30,000 and the college was named in honor of its founder. 

The present (1894) President and Trustees are as follows: 

TRUSTEES. 

Hon. John M. Butler, - - - - Indianapolis. 

Rev. R. J. Cunningham, - - - Crawfordsville. 

Hon. Jas. A. Mount. -.---- Shannondale, 
" Thomas N. Rice, - - - - Rockville. 

Mr. Charles H. Conner, - - - - New Albany. 

•• Walter J. Lewis, ----- Evansville. 

" W. R. McKeen, ----- Terre Haute. 

" B. G. Hudnut, ----- 

Rev. R. V. Hunter. - - - - - 
Mr. R. W. Rippetoe, ------ 



Hon. B. E. Rhoades, .... Terre Haute, 

Mr. S. C. Stimson, ..... 

■' Leslie D. Thomas. .... 

" H. P. Townley, ..... 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD. 

Mr. H. P. Townley, .... Terre Haute. 

The president of the college is the Kev. John Mason Duncan, who is 
assisted by a large and able faculty. 

ST. MARY'S ACADEMIC INSTITUTE. 

This is one of the most noted Catholic institutions for the education 
of young ladies in the West, situated just four miles west of the city in a 
charming location. It is under the direction of the Sisters of Providence, 
and it is also the mother house of that order in the United States. The 
first Academy, a two story brick building, was opened in 1841, in what was 
then a wilderness, by six Sisters of Providence who emigrated from France. 
The corner stone of the present large Academy was laid August 15, 1860, by 
Bishop de St. Palais. The average enrollment now is 200 pupils, coming 
from a number of Western and Southern states. The Academy celebrated 
its Golden Jubilee June 23, 1891. The ground of the Institute covers 400 
acres, and that part adjacent to the Institute is laid out in a very attractive 
manner. The imposing stone Chapel, which was begun in 1886, cost 
$175,000 and is of the Renaissance order. The faculty of the Institute 
comprises thirty teachers and much attention is given to painting and 
needle-work The Academy has its own electric light plant. 

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS. 

Parochial Schools are attached at present to all the Catholic Schools 
of Terre Haute except St. Ann's, which church was this year destroyed by 
fire. St. Joseph's Church has both a male and female school, the estimated 
value cf both being $25,000. The male school is a handsome pressed brick 
structure. St. Patrick's Church has its male and female School in one large 
brick building which cost about $8,000. The St. Benedict's (German) 
Church has a fine Parochial school valued at $20,000. The Sisters of Provi- 
dence exclusively teach in the Catholic schools of Terre Haute. 

CHURCHES. 

The Church edifices number forty- two. The various denominations 
are as follows: 

Baptist, 7; Catholic, 4; Christian, 3; Congregational, 3; Evangelical, 
2; Jewish Synagogue, 1; Lutheran, 2; Methodist Episcopal, 11; Presbyterian, 
3; Protestant Episcopal, 2; Reformed, 2; Seventh Day Advents, 1, and 
United Brethren, 1. 



THE HOME OF THE TROTTER. 

Terre Haute is the home of Axtell, the phenomenal. 

The Terre Haute race track is famous wherever the trotting liorse is 
known and prized. 

The 2:04 track in this city is the fastest in the world. All the greatest 
horses in America are trained here because the climate, the soil, the grass 
and the track are the best. 

The purses here, $90,000, for a single meeting, are the largest ever 
offered anywhere. 

But these are not the only distinctions for which the city is famous 
as the center of interest concerning the trotting horse. There are a number 
of great stock farms here.- Very large sums are invested and more is being 
constantly added in the successful breeding and training of record-beating 
trotters and high-priced roadsters. 

The principal stock farms are as follows: 

Warren Park, the home of Axtell. owned by Mr. W. P. Ijams. 

Edgewood Stock Farm, the home of Jersey Wilkes, owned by Prest. 
W. R. McKeen. 

Willow Ridge Farm, the property of Mr. P. J. Kaufman. 

More Park, owned by Mr. Benj. G. Cox. 

Others are Walnut Grove Farm, Beechwood Stock Farm, Anton 
Mayer Farm, and .Jno. Pugh Farm where coach horses are bred. 

THE RAILROADS. 

There are nine railroads entering Terre Haute. It is on the line of 
three of the largest railway systems in the country, the Pennsylvania and 
Vanderbilt systems, and the north and south lines of the Porter system. 

The lines are as follows: 

j T. H. & I. (Indianapolis Division) 72 miles. 
Pennsylvania j ST. L. V. & T. H. 168 miles. 
Svstem i MICHIGAN DIVISION, 223 miles. 

( PEORIA " 174 " 

Big Four I INDIANAPOLIS DIVISION, 75 miles 

System. \ ST. LOUIS " 187 " 

Porter and 
"Mackey'' 

Systems. 



c. 


& E. I. 178 miles. 


E. 


& T. H. 109 " 


E. 


& I. 138 " 



MANUFACTURES AND OTHER BRANCHES OF 

BUSINESS. 

The following table, prepared for the Gazette by Secretary C. M. 
Thompson, of the Business Men's Association, shows in detail the different 
branches of business and the number and character of manufactures in 1894. 
No. of Establishments. 



Agricultural Implements, Machinery, etc... 8 

Ale, Beer and Mineral Waters 4 

Art Specialties 6 

Auction Sales 4 

Bakers 16 

Banks 2 

Barrels " 

Baskets, Brooms and Willoware .t 

Blacksmiths and Horse Shoers 38 

Blank Books, Wood and Paper Boxes 5 

Blast Furnace 1 

Boilers and Sheet Iron 6 

Boots, Shoes, Leather and Leather Goods... 68 

Books and Stationarj- IC 

Brass Foundries 2 

Brick Yards 7 

Butchers 10 

Candv and Confectioneries 17 

Carriages, Wagons and Carts IS 

Carpenters and Builders 60 

Carpets and House Furnishings 10 

Car Works 1 

Cigars, Cigarettes and Cheroots 30 

Clothing 14 

Coal Dealers '.^0 

Coffee, Spice and Flavoring Mills 2 

Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, etc 40 

Dry Goods and Notions, Wholesale 4 

Retail 15 

Dyeing and Bleaching 4 

Electric Motors, Heaters, etc 1 

Feed and Produce 44 

Fish , Produce, etc 3 

Flour and Corn Meal 4 

Flour Mills 3 

Furniture, Awnings and Maitresses 9 

Foundries and Machine Shops 3 

Gas and Steam Fitting 8 



Groceries and Liquors, Wholesale 4 

Retail 200 

Gunsmiths, Sporting Gcods, etc 4 

Harness and Saddlery 9 

Hardware. Wholesale and Retail 9 

Hats and Caps 7 

Hominy Mills 3 

Hubs and Spokes 1 

Ice from River 3 

Ice, artificial 2 

Iron and Nail Works I 

Iron Manufacturers, Miscellaneous.... 2 

Jewelrj' 12 

Leather and Hides 2 

Lime and Cement 5 

Locksmiths 2 

Marble and Stone Works 7 

Millintry 15 

Newspapers and Job Printers lo 

Optical Instruments 6 

Overalls. Pants and Shirts 4 

Paper Manufacturers and Dealers 1 

Piano Case Works 1 

Paper Box Factory 1 

Photography 7 

Planing Mills 5 

Pressed Brick 1 

Pumps 3 

Oueeusware 7 

Rolling Mills 2 

Sash, Blinds, Doors, etc 7 

Sewing Machines 3 

Shovel , Fork and Ax Works 1 

Soap Works 1 

Straw Board Mill 1 

Stove Foundries 1 

Tinware and Plumbing 9 

Woolen Mills 1 



In the business world Terre Haute enjoys the distinction of having 
the largest wholesale grocery in the state, Hulman & Go's; the largest 
wholesale dry goods store, the Havens & Geddes Co. There are many 
other wholesale h.ouses, nearly every line of goods being represented. 

In manufactures the city heads the list with the largest car works in 
Indiana; two of the largest distilleries in the world; the headquarters and 
leading plant of the Standard Wheel Co.; the only piano case factory; the 
only shovel works in Indiana and is the center of overall factories. The next 
few years will see a great development of the manufacture of paving brick 
and other clay products in this county. Terre Haute leads all of the cities 
of the state in flour and hominy milling. 

HOTELS. 

Until recent years Terre Haute hotels did not rank conspicuously 
high, but the city is second to none in that respect now. The leading 



houses are the Terre Haute, which surpasses any in the State, the National, 
the New Filbeck, the New St. Nicholas, the Melville and the Bronsou. 

CHARITIES. 

The charitable institutions of Terre Haute are in an excellent con- 
dition and are successfully accomplishing a great work; the result of a 
charity that speaks in private and public donations of our citizens and 
through the munificence of the late Chauucey Rose. 

The object of the Society for Organizing Charity is the promotion of 
whatever tends to the permanent improvement of the poor. 8. B. Davis is 
President of the society and W. C. Smallwood, General Secretary. The 
society endeavors to make work the basis of relief and to this end runs an 
employment bureau, a workroom for women and a woodyard for men, where 
able bodied persons can earn meals and lodging at the Home for the Friend- 
less. Deserving poor, unable to work, are eared for free. Last year the 
society investigated about 2.500 cases. 

St Anthony's Hospital is now one of the best equipped institutions of 
its size in the country. It was establislied in September, 1882, by the Sisters 
of St. Francis, under whose care it still remains. In 1883 Mr. H. Hulman, 
its leading benefactor, purchased and fitted up the present building. He 
was assisted in the enterprise by donations amounting to about $10,000. 
The new St. Anthony's Hospital was dedicated January 1st. 1884. About 
5,000 patients have been cared for with a total mortality from all diseases 
of about eight per cent. One hundred patients can be accommodated at 
one time. 

The Terre Haute Sanitarium, a pay hospital, is managed by private 
individuals. 

FREE DISPENSARY. 

In the will of Chauncey Rose was a provision to set aside .$7.5.000 for 
the purpose of erecting and maintaining a dispensary for the free distribu- 
tion of drugs to the poor. The interest has now increased the amount to 
$130,000. A structure to cost $42,740 is now being built on a $15,000 lot at 
the corner of Seventh and Cherry streets. This building will furnish a 
permanent location for the Rose Dispensary, and the rents from the halls, 
store rooms and offices will increase the annual income. The original sum 
will be left as a permanent endowment. 

THE ROSE HOHB AND ST. ANN'S. 

The Rose Orphan Home was organized in 1874 and the buildings were 
formally dedicated on September 3rd, 1884. The permanent endowment 
fund, the gift of Mr. Rose, consists of investments estimated at $300,000. 
The buildings, grounds and improvements valued at $113,146, were paid for 
entirely with interest money. Up to the present date 463 children have 
been taken into the home. The average number is 90. L. P. Alden is the 
Superintendent. 

St. Ann's Orphan Asylum, located at the south east corner of Thir- 
teenth Street and Sixth Avenue, is connected with St. Ann's church and is 
under the direction of the Sisters of Providence. Girls, only, are cared for 
here. 



OLD LADIES' HOflE. 

The Old Ladies" Home, which is located on north Fifth Street, has, 
during the six years of its existence, furnished a friendly shelter to many 
feeble and needy women. W. R. McKeen purchased the site for this 
purpose and turned the management over to the Rose Ladies' Aid Society. 
The maintenance is by voluntary contributions and small legacies, which 
have been left it. 

A list of Terre Haute's charitable institutions would be Incomplete 
without mention of the Rose Ladies' Aid Society, Hebrew Ladies' Aid 
Society, Woman's Christian Temperance Uuion. Woman's Relief Corps, and 
the Aid Societies in the various churches, which devote much time to 
alleviating the wants of the poor. 

NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES. 

The newspapers now in Terre Haute (1894) were most of them estab- 
lished many years ago. The fact that during the past twenty years nearly 
twenty daily papers, started in competition with those below named, have 
suspended, with disastrous financial loss, would seem to indicate that the 
city will not support a larger number. 

XEWSPAPERS. 

The Daily Evening and Weekly Gazette (1868), published by Wm. C. 
and Spencer F. Ball; the Daily Morning and Weekly Express (1831), by 
Geo. M. Allen; the Saturday Evening Mail (1870), by Messrs. A. C. 
Duddleston and Fred Piepenbrink; the Daily Evening and Weekly Journal 
(1884) by .Jacob E. Wollf; the Afro-American Journal (1890), by J. W. 
Washington; the Wabash Exponent (1891) by J. W. Jarvis. 

MAGAZINES. 

Locomotive Firemen's Magazine (1875), National organ of the B. of 
L. F. ; the Military Mirror (1893), by Geo. W. Biegler and O. Hippelhauser. 

TERRE HAUTE BUSINESS HEN'S ASSOCIATION. 

The Terre Haute Business Men's Association has for officers (1894), 
Herman Hulmau, President; C. M. Thompson, Secretary; Frank McKeen, 
Treasurer. The rooms of the association are at 631^ Wabash Ave. The 
chief object of the association is to encourage manufactures. 

MISCELLANEOUS NOTES. 

Terre Haute has the cheapest artificial fuel gas in Indiana; also the 
cheapest steam coal. 

The electric street railway system has no superior. 

There are many miles of modern street paving. 

The Union Station is the handsomest in Indiana outside of 
Indianapolis. 

There are two artesian wells of the highest medicinal value; also 
large and well appointed bath houses. 

The soil in this section has no superior in the world for the produc- 
tion of vegetables and cereals. 

12 




HON RICHARD W. THOMPSON, 




PHOTO BY Bl EL. 



SENATOR DANIEL W. VOORHEES. 




WM R McKEEN, 

President Vandalia Ry. 




HERMAN HULMAN, ESQ. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



HON. THOMAS H. NELSON, 
Ex. U S. Minister to Chili; U. S. Envoy to Mexico, etc. 




^OM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



WM. E. McLEAN, 
Attorney, Ex-Deputy U. S. Commissioner of Pensions. 




FROM PMOTO BY BIEL. 



BLACKFORD CONDIT, D. D. 

Retired Presbyterian Minister. 




REV. J. H. CRUM, D. D., 
Pastor First Congregational Church, 




REV. S. V. LEECH, D. D. 
Pastor Centenary M. E. Church. 




REV. J. S. HOLMES, D. D. 

Pastor First Baptist Church. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIEL 



REV. R. V. HUNTER, Pastor. 

Central Presbyterian Church. 




PHOTO BY BIEL. 



REV. FRANK A. MORGAN, 

Pastor Central Christian Church. 




REV. J L. HOAGLAND, 
Associate Pastor Centenary M. E. Church. 




REV. JNO. RYVES, 

Rector of St. Ann's. 




WILLIAM W. PARSONS, 

President Indiana State Normal School. 

History and Philosophy of Education. 




ROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



HOWARD SANDISON, 
Vice-President Indiana State Normal School, Mental Science and Methods. 




PHOTO BY Bl E L. 



ROBERT G. GILLUM, 
Indiana State Nornnal School, Physics and Chennistry. 




=>OM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



LOUIS J. RETTGER, 
Indiana State Normal School, Biology. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



FRANCIS M. STALKER, 
Indiana State Normal School, Psychology and Methods. 




PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JAMES B. WISELY, 
Indiana State Normal School, Grammar, Rhetoric and Composition 




CHARLES M. CURRY, 
Indiana State Normal School, Assistant in Reading and Literature. 




ARTHUR CUNNINGHAM, 
Indiana State Normal School, Librarian, 




FROM PHOTO BV BIEL- 



WM. H. WILEY, 
Superintendent Public Schools. 




= ROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



H. W. CURRY, 
Superintendent Vigo County Schools 



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DAVID N. TAYLOR, 
Judge 43rd. Judicial Circuit of Indiana. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



HUGH D. ROQUET, 
Democratic Candidate for County Clerk. 




= HOM PHOTO Br BIEL. 



J. W. STOUT, 
Sheriff of Vigo County. 




(■ROM PHOTO BY BIEL.. 



GEO. A. SCHAAL, 

■ Auditor Vigo County. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JOHN L WALSH, 

County Treasurer. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



LEVI G. HUGHES, 

Recorder Vigo County 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



Dr. W. R. MATTOX, 

County Coroner. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



CHAS. W. HOFF, 
County Assessor, Vigo County. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JOHN BEAL, 
President Board County Coinnnissioners. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL- 



JOHN McFALL, 
County Commissioner. 




10T0 BY BIEL. 



RALPH H. SPARKS, 

Surveyor of Vigo County. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



FRED A ROSS, 
Mayor of Terre Haute. 




W. W. HAUCK, 

City Treasurer. 




CHARLES BALCH, 

City Treasurer, Elect. 




CHAS. H. GOODWIN, 
City Clerk, 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



PETER M. FOLEY, 
City Attorney. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



C. MEAGHER, 

Sup't Police. 




ROM PHOTO BY BIEL* 



H. S. BOSLER, 

City Engineer. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



MICHAEL J. O'CONNELL, 

Assessor Harrison Tp. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



GEO. W. PARIS, 
Attorney, Republican Nonninee for Congress. 




SAM. R. HAMILL, 

Attorney at Law. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIEL 



D. W. HENRY, 

Attorney at Law. 




PHOM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



ROBERT B. STIMSON, 
Attorney, Stiinson, Stimson &. Higgins. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL 



SAMUEL C. STIMSON, 
Attorney, Stimson, Stimson &. Higgins. 




GEORGE E PUGH, 
Attorney. 




=tOM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



SAMUEL M. HUSTON, 
Attorney at Law. Republican Candidate for Prosecuting Attorney. 




FORM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



E. H. REDMAN. 

Attorney. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



ALVIN M. HIGGINS, 
Attorney, Stimson, Stimson &. Higgins, 




H. A. CONDIT, 
Attorney, of Stimson, Stimson &. Higgins, 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



W. H. TABER, 

Attorney at Law, 




FROM FHOTO BY BIEL. 



A. W. SPAIN, M. D. 
President County Board of Health. 




FROM PHOTO BY BEIL. 



WILBUR 0. JENKINS, M. D. 
President of City Board of Health. 




LE'ON J. WILLIEN. M D. 




JNO. R. CRAPO, M. D. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



F. W. SHALEY, M. D. 




FROM PMOTO BY BIEL. 



ALLEN H. DONHAM, 

Postmaster, 




lOM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



WM. 0. PATTON, 

Assistant Postmaster. 




B. G. HUDNUT, 
President Vigo County National Bank, 

also President of the Hudnut Company. 




GEORGE E. FARRINGTON, 
Secretary & General Agent Vandalia Line. 




N. K. ELLIOTT, 
General Superintendent Vandaiia Line. 




C. R. PEDDLE, 
Purchasing Agent Vandalia Line. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEU. 



R. D. DIGGES, 
Ticket Agent Union Depot, Vandalia Line. 



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A. G. NICHOSON, 
Central States Dispatch, Fast Freight. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



FRANK E. BENJAMIN, 
Agent American Express Co. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL- 



LYMAN P. ALDEN, 
Sup't Rose Orphan Home. ,_ 




^OM PHOTO BY BIEL- 



J. BREINIG, 
Leader Ringgold Band and Orchestra. 

Late Leader 24th and 91st Ind. Vol. Band, 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



C H. PAYNE, 
Manager The Hughes Decorating Co. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



W. C. SMALLWOOD, 
General Secretary Organized Charities. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



W. H. FLOYD, 
Architect of Floyd &. Stone. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



GUY STONE, 
Floyd &. Stone, Architects, 




FROM PHOtO by BIEL. 



JOHN A. BOGGS, 
With Jos. Strong &. Co. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JAS. C. COUPER, 
Manager Standard Wheel Go's Factory. 




^OM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



LOUIS P. SEEBURGER, 
Democratic Candidate for Sheriff. 




PBOM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



J. W. LANDRUM, 
Manager Terre Haute Coal and Linne Co., and 

Secretary Coal Bluff Mining Co. 




= nOM PHOTO BY BIEL, 



WILLIS WRIGHT, 
Furniture. Carpets and Dtapery. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



E. L. NORCROSS, 
Manager Western Union Telegraph Co. 




lOM PHOTO BY BIELi 



T. J. GRIFFITH, 

Palace Shoe Store. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JAMES A, NISBET 
Undertaker. 




= ROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



W. M. SLAUGHTER, 
Real Estate Broker, Loan and Insurance. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JOHN FOULKES, 
Real Estate, Loan and Insurance Agent, 




= ROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



H. T. BIEL, 

Photographer. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



CHAS. E. GAREN, 

New Method Laundry. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



WM. A. HUNTER, 
Hunter's Livery, Ball Bearing Harness, 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



C. W. KELLY, 
Mining, Municipal and General Eng. 




FROM PMOTO BY BIEL. 



JAMES M. DISHON, ' 
Bill Paster and Distributor. 




FHOM PHOTO BY BIEL, 



GEO. H. GREENMAN, 
Manager Pixley &. Co., Clothiers and Furnishers. 




PROM PHOTO BY BIBL. 



GEO. R. GRIMES, 
Civil Engineer and Contractor. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



JAMES E, SOMES, 
Pharmacist. 




ROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



C. E. ERVIN, 

Dentist 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



DR. C. F. WILLIAMS, 
Dentist. 




FHOM PHOTO BY SIEL' 



C. M. THOMPSON, 
Secretary Terre Haute Business Mens Association. 




FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



W. C. ISBELL, 
President Terre Haute Commercial College. 



■||l~T?rPiri jjiW"k " ■*" 







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FROM PHOTO BY BIEL. 



HENRY P. TOWNLEY, ESQ.. 
President of the Board of Trustees of Coates College. 




= 0F1M PHOTO BY BIEL. 



THE REV. JOHN MASON DUNCAN, 
President of Coates College, 



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CHARLES BAUR, Proprietor 
TERRE HAUTE HOUSE. 





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FROM PHOTO BY BIEL- 



HULMAN & COMPANY, 
Wholesale Grocers. 




lOM PHOTO BY BIEL- 

ELLIOTT & SMITH. Wholesale Hat House. 




NATIONAL STATE BANK. 




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10M PMOTO BY BIEL. 



GOVERNMENT BUILDING. 





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